Of World Music and Sovereign States, Professors and the Formation of Legal Norms

Of World Music and Sovereign States, Professors and the Formation of Legal Norms

Let us consider three ways in which legal academics may have missed the mark. The first, discussed in Part II, bears on the formation of copyright norms for the Internet domestically-and how legal scholars appear to have overestimated the receptivity of courts to certain arguments. Part III then discusses the formation of transnational legal norms and the ways in which American professors appear to have underappreciated how the Internet is prompting a round of deeper transnational legal harmonization than we have seen in the past. Finally, Part IV poses a question about a different meta-norm: What is the proper norm or role for professors, law and otherwise, in these ongoing policy debates? Even if there is no “right” answer to this question-one in which we can all believe-surely the question is worth asking for the sake of “the process of intellectual openness itself.”

Justin Hughes

Loyola University Chicago Law Journal

2003

I didn't find this helpful.This was helpful. Please let us know if you found this article helpful.
Loading...
By |2019-09-18T11:50:09-08:00January 1st, 2018|Copyright, Intellectual Property, Reference|